DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.”

― Carl Sagan

 

Everything I am is the product of genetic, memetic, cultural, linguistic, and academic evolution. My intents and purposes found genesis in the chaotic intersections of my neurons—neural pathways forged and finessed by the interplay of mother’s song, father’s drum, nature’s call, and random chance. What purpose is there to any of it? Life changes everything in the end. Ability decays, health fades, life decomposes and all returns to dust.

 

My life will end, no more significant than a butterfly in Morocco. But just as the chaos of life forms me from dust, my motion, my action, my intention contributes to the relentless swirl of chaos, influencing developments around the globe. I have nothing to lose. I am already a progeny of everything in the deep past, and a progenitor of everything in the deep future.

 

I appreciate life and chaos. I marvel at how large the cosmos are, and how tiny I am. I know that it will continue without me. As Steve Jobs said,

 

“Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

— Steve Jobs

 

Like a butterfly in Morocco, my small collection of dust may have a significant unattributed influence on the universe, and it may not. I could live my life afraid of making a mistake, of spoiling my opportunity to remake the world, or I could just realize that I have nothing to lose.

 

I appreciate the beauty of life, and of the non-living cosmos, and of humanity. I appreciate diversity and chaos. I am happy to simply live and let live. I enjoy the experience that I have. I am not resigned to hopeless chance, but rather embrace the power of chaos.

 

I know I have power to change the world, so I’m not afraid to try. I also don’t feel a responsibility to change the world, so I’m not afraid to fail. What I want to do is to follow my heart. There are many things I want to do to advance life’s diversity and expansion.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Short Term Goals

  • Read Cervantes’s Don Quixote
  • Finish the re-write of my novel, Sara and the Pooka
  • Become more familiar with iOS development
  • Finish The Great Courses' The History of World Literature
  • Complete my AS in General Studies at SLCC

    Complete ENGL 2010 with an A
    Complete ENGL 2600 with an A
    Complete HIST 1700 with an A

Long Term Goals

  • Publish Sara and the Pooka
  • Publish Read to Me (the book) with a major publisher
  • Publish Read to Me (the app) in the iOS App Store
  • Localize Read to Me (the app) in Chinese, French, Arabic, Hindi, and Swahili
  • Learn to read all the above languages
  • Read Flaubert’s Madame Bovary in French

  • Read Wu Cheng’en’s Monkey in Chinese

  • Read Cervantes’s Don Quixote in Spanish

  • Read “Child’s Play” in Japanese: Manga Edition

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

SLCC's General Education Learning Outcomes

 

Students communicate effectively. This includes developing critical literacies—reading, writing, speaking, listening, visual understanding—that they can apply in various contexts; Organizing and presenting ideas and information visually, orally, and in writing according to standard usage; Understanding and using the elements of effective communication in interpersonal, small group, and mass settings. 

 

The best indications of my ability to communicate effectively are:

  • Link to evidence here
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Students develop quantitative literacies necessary for their chosen field of study. This includes approaching practical problems by choosing and applying appropriate mathematical techniques; Using information represented as data, graphs, tables, and schematics in a variety of disciplines; Applying mathematical theory, concepts, and methods of inquiry appropriate to program-specific problems.

 

The best indications of my quantitative literacy are:

  • Link to evidence here
  • Link to evidence here


Students think critically and creatively. This includes reasoning effectively from available evidence; demonstrating effective problem solving; engaging in creative thinking, expression, and application; Engaging in reflective thinking and expression; Demonstrating higher-order skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation; Making connections across disciplines; Applying scientific methods to the inquiry process. 

 

The best indicators of my critical thinking are:

  • Link to evidence here
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The best indicators of my creativity are:

  • Link to evidence here
  • Link to evidence here

Students develop civic literacy and the capacity to be community-engaged learners who act in mutually beneficial ways with community partners. This includes producing learning artifacts indicating understanding of the political, historical, economic or sociological aspects of social change and continuity; thinking critically about—and weighing the evidence surrounding—issues important to local, national, or global communities; participating in a broad range of community-engagement and/or service-learning courses for community building and an enhanced academic experience. 

 

The best indicators of my preparation for or involvement in civic engagement are:

  • Link to evidence here
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Students develop the knowledge and skills to work with others in a professional and constructive manner. This includes engaging with a diverse set of others to produce professional work; Interacting competently across cultures; understanding and appreciating human differences; Understanding and acting on standards of professionalism and civility, including the SLCC Student Code of Conduct.

 

The best indicators of my ability to work with others are:

  • Link to evidence here
  • Link to evidence here

Students develop computer and information literacy. This includes using contemporary computer hardware and software to effectively complete college-level assignments; Gathering and analyzing information using technology, library resources, and other modalities; Understanding and acting upon ethical and security principles with respect to computer technology and to information acquisition and distribution; distinguishing between credible and non-credible sources of information, and using the former in their work in an appropriately documented fashion. 

 

The best indicators of my computer literacy are:

  • Link to evidence here
  • Link to evidence here

The best indicators of my information literacy are:

  • Link to evidence here
  • Link to evidence here

Students develop the attitudes and skills for lifelong wellness. This includes understanding the importance of physical activity and its connection to lifelong wellness; learning how participation in a fitness, sport or leisure activity results in daily benefits including stress reduction, endorphin release, and a sense of well-being.

 

The best indicator of my understanding of lifelong wellness is:

  • Link to evidence here
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.